World History

Source 1

Reconstruction of the Aztec Great Temple of Tenochtitlan

Source 2:

“This great city contains a large number of temples, or houses, for their idols, very handsome edifices, which are situated in the different districts and the suburbs; in the principal ones religious persons of each particular sect are constantly residing, for whose use, besides the houses containing the idols, there are other convenient habitations. All these persons dress in black, and never cut or comb their hair from the time they enter the priesthood until they leave it; and all the sons of the principal inhabitants, both nobles and respectable citizens, are placed in the temples and wear the same dress from the age of seven or eight years until they are taken out to be married; which occurs more frequently with the first-born who inherit estates than with the others. The priests are debarred from female society, nor is any woman permitted to enter the religious houses. They also abstain from eating certain kinds of food, more at some seasons of the year than others.

Among these temples there is one which far surpasses all the rest, whose grandeur of architectural details no human tongue is able to describe; for within its precincts, surrounded by a lofty wall, there is room enough for a town of five hundred families. Around the interior of the enclosure there are handsome edifices, containing large halls and corridors, in which the religious persons attached to the temple reside. There are fully forty towers, which are lofty and well built, the largest of which has fifty steps leading to its main body, and is higher than the tower of the principal tower of the church at Seville. The stone and wood of which they are constructed are so well wrought in every part, that nothing could be better done, for the interior of the chapels containing the idols consists of curious imagery, wrought in stone, with plaster ceilings, and wood-work carved in relief, and painted with figures of monsters and other objects. All these towers are the burial places of the nobles, and every chapel in them is dedicated to a particular idol, to which they pay their devotions.”

Hernan Cortés, Second Letter to Charles V, ca. 1520

The description of Tenochtitlan’s temples in Source 2 indicates that which of the following was true of Aztec society in the sixteenth century?

(A) It was outward-focused and relied upon networks of ocean trade.
(B) It was highly complex and contained large numbers of skilled artisans.
(C) It was egalitarian in its treatment of women.
(D) It had largely peaceful relations with neighboring civilizations.
  1. Correct Answer: B

    Explanation:

    Cortés’s description of the grandeur and architectural mastery of the temple at Tenochtitlan supports other accounts from the sixteenth century, as well as archaeological evidence that points to the Aztecs being highly advanced, with well-developed institutions and vast building programs. Therefore, (B) is the best answer.

Test ID: 1158
Source: AP World History Practice Tests